fbpx

To lose fat, do your cardio on an empty stomach

This is hugely debated amongst personal trainers whether to do cardio on an empty stomach or not. Now there is a train of thought that doing so will help burn off the excess fat around the body. However training on an empty stomach can be VERY dangerous and any time I have been approached by clients with this idea my recommendation has always been to have something in your stomach or eaten something prior to exercise to help start you burning energy and also to stop you from fainting or feeling very dizzy which can 100% happen no matter how fit you are. My recommendation instead of an empty stomach would be having a piece of fruit or two prior to training early in the morning as this won’t be too heavy and should be used fairly effectively by your body since it is natural.

Remember during the night your body is still burning energy to keep you alive so you’ve basically spent 8-10 burning energy and your body is primed to receive it in the morning when you wake. I’m not saying have a bowl of porridge waiting for you next to your bed but taking part in vigorous activity is the WORST thing you could be doing when you haven’t eaten prior.

Be smart and consistent with training and make sure you refuel after and you are already on the right path!

 

A High-Protein Diet Increases Strain on the Kidneys and Raises Your Risk of Kidney Disease

So high protein diets have been made out by many to be dangerous to your kidneys and may increase your chances for kidney disease.

The danger actually comes from anything heavily processed due to the chemicals and processing they use and can totally agree that a diet high in processed meats will cause your body all sorts of problems and not just to the kidneys. If you are a meat eater I would highly recommend going to the Butchers or even going organic.

Obviously natural forms of protein are great and here is a list of other sources of protein outside of the norm that you would associate:

  • Beans
  • Nuts
  • Legumes

Each of these has a huge amount of variety of e.g. Soya bean are a legume and a great source of protein.

 

I’m eating under my guideline calories so I’ll lose weight

That is not necessarily true dependant on what you eat obviously you need calories or energy to survive so you have to eat. An important question that a lot of people don’t know how to answer is, “What is a calorie?”

The definition of what a calorie is:

‘The energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water through 1 °C’

How does this relate to the body?!!?

Well in Protein, Fats and Carbohydrates they all have varying amounts per gram of energy stored inside:

  • Protein have 4 calories per gram
  • Carbohydrates have 4 calories per gram
  • Fat have 9 calories per gram

Your body needs to break these down first to get to use the energy locked inside.

How they are each processed by your body actually costs your body energy. Out of the 3, protein costs your body the most energy to process and it also needs fat in order to process it. What I mean by processing is the form it is in when it goes into your mouth is then broken down into amino acids then reconstructed into something your body can use whether that is for energy, repair or building new muscle.

Comparatively breaking down sugars and storing as fat is relatively cheap for your body so out of the macros you certainly want a diet with quality protein and fat in rather than a high carbohydrate diet and hitting your overall calorie goal. So basically eating rich in carbohydrate to the amount of the daily guidelines could be very detrimental.

So to summarise try and hit the calorie guidance however keep a variety of macronutrients (Protein, Fats & Carbs) but make sure you include quality sources of all even following the general advice of the Eatwell plate would be a good start for most although I would substitute the bread, pasta section for more of the other nutrition groups.

eatwell3.jpg

If you need any help with this please get in touch I hope this has helped you!